Condensed Matter Physics
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Condensed matter physics concerns itself with properties of systems containing many interacting degrees of freedom; few examples are insulators and superconductors, liquids and solids, quantum spin chains, polymers or biological molecules. It is the largest subfield within physics -- approximately a third of the members of the APS consider themselves condensed matter physicists of one kind or another. Often, condensed matter physics is informally divided into two parts: "hard" and "soft", depending on whether quantum mechanical effects are crucial or not.

At Johns Hopkins one finds a large and vibrant condensed matter physics community, of both hard and soft persuasions. This page is meant to be a web surfer's port-of-entry to our various activities.
Faculty

Armitage
Broholm
Chien
Judd
Leheny
Markovic
McQueen
Reich
Robbins
Tchernyshyov
Tesanovic
Walker

Affiliated faculty

Dukan
Drichko
Nikolic
Petrovic
Sacramento
Stiles

Research Scientists

Wynn-Guikema
Koohpayeh

Visiting Scientist

Felton

Postdocs

Akarapu
Barath
Chen
Cvetkovic
Del Maestro
Ligneres
Lin
Rahman
Valdes
Wang
Zhao

PhD students

Benveniste
Brust
Bilbro
Cabrera
Cappallo
Chen
Cheng
Copeland
Ge
Guo
Hao
Hartman
Huang
Johns
Kang
Kirschner
Lee
Li
Lim
Liu
Liu
Makhfudz
Mellado
Morgan-Wall
Murray
Petrova
Richman
Rovner
Salerno
Shao
Shelley
Stanev
Thampy
Wan
Wen
Xu
Zhu

Alumni

Ambrose
Anguelouch
Bandyopadhyay
Bao
Belak
Cai
Chen
Cheng
Chern
Childress
Clarke
Concha
Cvetkovic
Davidovic
Dender
Denniston
Franz
Freeland
Freeland
Gasparovic
Gavrin
Gokemeijer
Herbut
Hong
Hoy
Hsu
Ji
Ji
Jiang
Jonas
Kenzelmann
Kramer
Lacevic
Lapointe
S Lee
MH Lee
Liang
Liou
Liu
Luan
Maloney
Martys
Melikyan
Merchant
Muser
Nambu
Nie
Unruh
Qiu
Qiu
Rottler
Savici
Silevitch
Singh
Stevens
Stock
Stone
Strijkers
Sun
Tanase
Trietiakov
Urazhdin
Unruh
Vafek
Valentine
G Xiao
JQ Xiao
Xing
Xu
Yang
Yardimci
Youk
Zaliznyak
Zhu

Second Hopkins-Nanjing Physics Workshop will be held March 5-6, 2012, in the Bloomberg Center. Detailed information is here.

JHU Physics and Astronomy is ranked #9(12) in the United States and #12(16) worldwide in the latest 2010(11) rankings by HEEACT (Taiwan), based on performance of scientific publications. The same rankings place Johns Hopkins as #3(2) among the world's top universities. This is in line with high standings in various earlier rankings, such as those by Academic Analytics, which ranks JHU PHA well within the top 10 in both physics and astronomy & astrophysics. For more academic rankings click here.

The DOE-funded Institute for Quantum Matter, a collaboration between Johns Hopkins and Princeton Universities, combines materials synthesis, advanced spectroscopy, and theory to uncover new materials functionality based on quantum correlations. The Principal Investigators are C. Broholm (Director), N. P. Armitage, R. J. Cava (Princeton), T. McQueen, O. Tchernyshyov, and Z. Tesanovic. Areas of interest include frustrated quantum magnetism, quantum criticality, quantum impurities, correlated superconductivity, and the interplay between these phenomena. IQM is currently soliciting applications for postdoctoral and staff positions. Successful candidates will participate in coordinated research at the interface between theoretical and experimental condensed matter physics, chemistry, and materials science.

The Fifth International Conference on Highly Frustrated Magnetism was held at Johns Hopkins August 1-6, 2010. The conference web page is here. The ICAM Conference on Exotic Insulating States of Matter was held at Johns Hopkins January 14-16, 2010. The conference web page is here.

Research

Our group maintains active experimental and theoretical research programs at the forefront of both "hard" and "soft" condensed matter physics. Examples of the former are quantum magnets studied by neutron scattering techniques (Broholm, Reich), experiment and theory of magnetic nanostructures and quantum nanowires (Chien, Markovic, Reich, Tchernyshyov, Walker), broadband microwave and terahertz spectroscopy of correlated electron systems (Armitage), physics and chemistry of new materials (McQueen), and theory of correlated magnets, rare-earth metals and superconductors (Judd, Tchernyshyov, Tesanovic). The latter includes dynamical studies of conformational transition in proteins (Armitage), x-ray and neutron scattering studies of glasses and out-of-equilibrium complex fluids (Leheny), biological applications of nanostructures (Markovic, Reich) and analytic and computer-aided theory of non-equilibrium processes, adhesion and friction (Robbins).

JHU is the home of Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) on magnetic nanostructures and magnetoelectronics, a large NSF funded center for interdisciplinary research in nanotechnology, and the newly-formed DOE supported Johns Hopkins-Princeton Institute for Quantum Matter (IQM). Nearby NIST, a large government research lab and a premier US facility for neutron scattering research, benefits from close involvement of several JHU groups, most notably through a multi-million dollar Multi Axis Crystal Spectrometer (MACS), conceived and built at JHU. Our group is committed to interdisciplinary research in both hard and soft physical sciences and takes advantage of JHU's preeminent status in nanomaterials, biophysical and biomedical sciences and bioengineering through numerous interactions and collaborations with Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Biophysics, Biomedical and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, notably under the auspices of the JHU Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT). In addition, the JHU Applied Physics Laboratory has a large program in applied condensed matter sciences and is a leading center in quantum optics and optical quantum computing. Finally, the JHU's central location in the Baltimore-Washington metro area places it at the heart of one of the largest condensed matter science communities in the United States.

Recent Highlights

Johns Hopkins scientists are at the forefront of the exciting new field of iron-based high temperature superconductors (see recent article in USA Today on Top Ten Science Developments in 2009). These new materials are different from old copper-oxide-based HTS and offer a possible new pathway to room temperature supercoonductivity and its many applications. See their paper in Nature and the JHU press release.

The JHU led Partnership for Research and Education in Materials (PREM) is chosen as a new NSF funded collaboration aiming to enhance minority participation in research and education in nanomaterials. The PREM at Johns Hopkins, Howard University and Prince George's Community College will receive $2.75 million over five years and is one of six new such partnerships receiving a total of $15.4 million from the National Science Foundation. The others are California State and Princeton universities; Jackson State University and the University of California, Santa Barbara; Norfolk State and Cornell universities; Tuskegee and Cornell universities; and the University of New Mexico and Harvard University. The full story is here and here.

Below are several links highlighting the variety of research themes pursued by our group. More details are available at web pages of individual faculty.

Events & Activities

The main group activities include a weekly condensed matter physics seminar, journal club and departmental colloquium where latest research developements are discussed with a steady stream of visitors from around the world. In addition, individual research groups hold their own regular schedule of meetings, often in collaboration with other JHU departments. Every year or two an especially distinguished condensed matter physicist spends three days at JHU as a Brickwedde Lecturer in Physics.

Centers, Research Groups & Facilities

Johns Hopkins is the home of NSF-funded MRSEC on magnetic nanostructures, DOE-funded JHU-Princeton Institute for Quantum Matter, and a large multidisciplinary Institute for NanoBioTechnology. We also have an active scientific and instrumentation development program at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. State-of-the-art equipment includes RF sputtering, Molecular Beam Epitaxy machine and laser ablation thin film deposition tools, a Focused Ion Beam writer, a class 1000 clean room, a single crystal growth facility including two image furnaces (Xenon and Halogen), 20% beam time on the cold neutron spectrometer, MACS, at the NIST Center for Neutron Research, Scanning Electron and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, a 14 Tesla 50 mK-1000 K PPMS system, several Dilution Refrigerators for transport and magnetothermal measurements, a cryogenic system for neutron scattering at 11.5 Tesla and 25 mK, and a 64 node beowulf computing cluster, as well as most advanced general computing facilities.

  • MRSEC: NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center on magnetic nanostructures and magnetoelectronics.
  • IQM: DOE funded Johns Hopkins-Princeton Institute for Quantum Matter.
  • MACS: Multi Axis Crystal Spectrometer, a cold neutron scattering spectrometer built at JHU and installed at the NIST Center for Neutron Research.
  • Nanostructured Materials Laboratory
  • INBT: JHU Institute for NanoBioTechnology.
  • CNBT: Cold Neutrons for Biology and Technology.
  • Multiscale Modeling Group: JHU's NSF funded Nanoscale Interdisciplinary Research Team
  • IDG: JHU's state-of-the-art instrument development group.
  • Machine shop: A condensed matter experimentalist's best friend.
  • Computer center: Top-of-the-line departmental computing facilities.

Contact

Emails and phones
Click on the name in the left panel to get to the web pages, needed email addresses and/or phone numbers of an individual group member.

Mailing address
Department of Physics & Astronomy
Bloomberg Center
Johns Hopkins University
3400 North Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
Group & IQM Administrator
Ms. Sharon Karsk
Bloomberg 325
Email: karsk@pha.jhu.edu
Phone: 410.516.8429
Fax: 410.516.7239
Group & MRSEC Administrator
Ms. Lauren Fowler
Bloomberg 305
Email: lfowler@pha.jhu.edu
Phone: 410.516.2372
Fax: 410.516.7239

Visiting Johns Hopkins?
Our group welcomes visitors interested in exchange of scientific ideas and research collaborations. The best way of arranging a visit is to contact the faculty member(s) in your area of interest, preferably by email or phone. We are located in the Bloomberg Center on the Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University. The directions to Bloomberg Center are here. Various links of interest in the Baltimore-Washington metro area are here.

Interested in PhD program at Johns Hopkins?
If you are planning on pursuing PhD studies in condensed matter physics you should be aware that the Johns Hopkins University has much to offer to a talented and ambitious graduate student as one of the leading educational and research institutions in the United States (see various rankings). We have a well-balanced graduate student body with many international, female and minority students. Alumni of our group go on to occupy prominent positions in academia, government and industrial research laboratories, and various financial and business institutions. If you would like to apply for graduate study at JHU this web page has all the relevant information on our PhD program including the application forms: http://www.pha.jhu.edu/admiss/grad/.

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Designed by Zlatko Tesanovic. Fair use only.